Something for Everyone: The Tumblr API

December 19 2014

Today, we decided to write a blog post about blogging. Specifically, we wanted to take a look at the Tumblr API, a multifunctional social media API in our Library that (quite literally) tends to fade into the background in posts like this. Tumblr’s API presents a wealth of opportunities for creative integration of text, images, videos, links, quotes, audio, and chat into applications, and our Choreos support all that functionality and more.

To cover the breadth of what the Tumblr API can let you do, our API team built thirty-four Choreos and organized them into five bundles. Most processes having to do with the actual blog content are part of our Posts bundle, which covers creating, editing, deleting, retrieving, liking, and unliking posts. We’ve also got a Blog bundle for retrieving high-level information, such as title or follower count; a Tagged bundle for searching for posts by subject matter; and a User bundle for following, unfollowing, and accessing information about a particular user. Of course, there’s also an OAuth bundle to simplify the process of acquiring access tokens for those who will be using the apps you build.

Inspired? Give it a try—Tumblr makes it easy to post, share, and discover all sorts of interesting online media, and with their API and our Choreos, it’s just as easy to integrate everything that Tumblr enables you to do into the apps that you build.

Today, we decided to write a blog post about blogging. Specifically, we wanted to take a look at the Tumblr API, a multifunctional social media API in our Library that (quite literally) tends to fade into the background in posts like this. Tumblr’s API presents a wealth of opportunities for creative integration of text, images, […]

New Choreos for the New Amazon Cloud Drive API

November 11 2014

You may have used Amazon Cloud Drive before to store and manage your digital content across the various devices that you use. You may also have heard that Amazon just released a public API for the service (and if you haven’t heard, you can read all about it here). Well, we’re excited to have been a part of that release: we’ve been working behind the scenes with the team at Amazon to get a set of Amazon Cloud Drive Temboo Choreos built, documented, and ready to use right away! They join over 200 other Amazon Choreos already in the Temboo Library, giving you a full suite of powerful Amazon web tools to quickly and easily build into your applications.Now you can upload files, access content, and more with this excellent new Amazon Cloud Drive API in any of the programming languages that Temboo supports, and, as always, you can use IoT Mode to program your Arduino or Texas Instruments hardware to connect to our Amazon Cloud Drive Choreos. With Amazon Cloud Drive and Temboo, it’s now even easier to collect, store, and transmit data across your network of devices, whether you’re connecting with WiFi, Ethernet, GSM, or Bluetooth Low Energy, and to use those devices to build a smarter Internet of Things.

You may have used Amazon Cloud Drive before to store and manage your digital content across the various devices that you use. You may also have heard that Amazon just released a public API for the service (and if you haven’t heard, you can read all about it here). Well, we’re excited to have been […]

Temboo and PagerDuty: Alert on the Internet of Everything

July 22 2014

Today we have a guest post about our new PagerDuty Choreos from Vivian Au at PagerDuty; the post originally appeared on the PagerDuty Blog:

Our customers are natural tinkers and builders, and we’re excited to launch our integration with Temboo. Many PagerDuty customers have found great success in using our solution to alert the right person and teams when issues occur in their systems and software. Some PagerDuty customers have been applying our alerting and on-call capabilities to other unique use cases such as creating an on-call rotation for roommate chores and sending alerts when trees are illegally cut down.

Temboo offers a unique programming platform that normalizes access to 100+ APIs, databases, and code utilities to give developers the ability to connect to other applications without all the headache.

APIs are powerful, but require maintenance

Applications aren’t useful when they are siloed. APIs are a common set of requirements to help disparate applications to talk with one another. For developers, the need to maintain these integrations and keep up with API documentation is a hassle. Temboo sits on top of APIs to abstract the complexity from managing and integrating with other applications. With Temboo, you can generate just a few lines of code in the programming language of your choice from your browser, and use those few lines to easily incorporate the benefits of over 2000 API processes into your project.

Helping makers connect

Arduino is an open-source, lightweight computer designed to provide an easy way for makers to create devices that interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. The uses of Arduino are endless. With the ability to sense the environment, tinkers have created robots, thermostats, and motion detectors from scratch. Temboo partners with Arduino to make it easier for projects to interact with web applications. With Temboo, every Arduino can easily grab data and interact with web-based services like Fitbit, Facebook, Google, and now PagerDuty. Temboo’s integration with PagerDuty (aka PagerDuty Choreos) will make it easier for Arduino and other hardware to trigger PagerDuty alerts.

For example, if you really want to buy a drone on eBay and want to get real-time alerts when it is listed, with Temboo’s eBay and PagerDuty Choreos, you can do just that. Or if you want to receive an alert whenever the humidity in your greenhouse dips below a certain level, you can use Temboo’s PagerDuty Choreos for that, too. Or even if you just want an alert every time the weather at the beach is warm enough to go swimming, Temboo and PagerDuty can take care of that as well–all this and more can be done with just a few short lines of code thanks to Temboo’s integration with PagerDuty.

Let your imagination take you far and away. Read this integration guide to start connecting PagerDuty with the Internet of Everything.

Today we have a guest post about our new PagerDuty Choreos from Vivian Au at PagerDuty; the post originally appeared on the PagerDuty Blog: Our customers are natural tinkers and builders, and we’re excited to launch our integration with Temboo. Many PagerDuty customers have found great success in using our solution to alert the right […]

Dev Diary: Coding without Temboo

October 11 2012

In October of 2012, Temboo released a special kind of DevShortcut: superpowerChoreos that take care of a host of development tasks and hook into multiple APIs. One of them was called GoodCitizen.Civic and it returned civic information from a specified area using data.gov, SunlightLabs, LittleSis, and GovTrack … in five lines of code.

The following is a page found from a developer’s logbook as he tried to build the very same app (minus one API):  

I’ll start by trying to get demographic data from Data.gov. The overall Data.gov documentation is a sprawling mess. Finally I realize that the actual API I’m looking for isn’t listed under the Census or Demographics sections at all – it’s actually called the “broadband map API.” (And here I was thinking that broadband was about internet connections, rather than census counts. Whatever.)

There’s no API wrapper that I could find for the Data.gov “broadband map” API, so I’m just going to make the HTTP call directly myself. Awesome. In order to do that, I need an HTTP client library – the Apache HTTPClient lib has worked well for me in the past, so I’ll add that to the project.

Of course, since it’s an Apache library I actually need to add in 4 other libraries that are dependencies (httpmime, httpcore, commons-codec, and commons-logging).

To efficiently handle the data returned by Data.gov, I need to add another library – Apache IOUtils. (Yes, I could do my stream-to-string conversions, etc., without this, but it would make the code much longer.) Now that I’ve found my way to the right place, the Data.gov API documentation isn’t fantastic, but after spending a bit of quality time wrestling with the syntax I can make the call.

Now, on to Sunlight Labs.

The Sunlight Labs API docs page points me at a Java library on Github created 3 years ago by some guy named “lordjoe” (https://github.com/lordjoe/java-sunlightapi/)

The documentation refers to some JAR files that don’t actually exist in the git repo, but whatever; I’ll give it a try.

I cloned the repo and ran the test program; it fails with an error. Not exactly encouraging, but…

Upon further investigation, it turns out that lordjoe’s Sunlight Labs wrapper API I downloaded doesn’t actually include a method to get a list of legislators by coordinates. Fantastic. Fortunately, there’s another Sunlight Labs wrapper on Github written by “tdanforth” two years ago. This one isn’t referenced by their documentation, but I’ll give it a try.

Again, this library is in source format — there’s no JAR available — but at this point I don’t really care. (tdanford has actually included an ANT buildfile, but it’s not worth trying to reconfigure now. I’ll just add this as an item on my todo-list, if I actually get this library functioning.)

The API wrapper provided by tdanford does include a method to list legislators by coordinates (hooray!) but it turns out the way the library is structured doesn’t actually let me use the method because the Legislators API object is defined as a private inner class (@#$%#@!) – so it looks like I’m going to need to refractor tdanford’s API wrapper to make it work in my project.

Refactor completed. Next, I want to use the Sunlight Labs API data to make a request to GovTrack to get information about what each legislator has voted for. As far as I can tell, the only API wrapper available for GovTrack is in Ruby – so again, I’m going to need to write my own wrapper. Fortunately, the GovTrack API documentation is really clean and well presented, so hopefully it won’t hurt too much.

The last step in my project is connecting to Capitol Words, to retrieve top phrases for each of the legislators. There doesn’t seem to be any wrapper library at all for the CapitolWords API, so I’m back to assembling my own HTTP requests. (Deep breath.)

Final status:
Lines of code (without doing any parsing on the API data): 234
External library dependencies: 9

In October of 2012, Temboo released a special kind of DevShortcut: superpowerChoreos that take care of a host of development tasks and hook into multiple APIs. One of them was called GoodCitizen.Civic and it returned civic information from a specified area using data.gov, SunlightLabs, LittleSis, and GovTrack … in five lines of code. The following is a page found […]

The Wonderful Wizard of OAuth

July 16 2012

Version (numero 1.71) of Temboo is being released today and includes the fruit of our creative (and bug-stomping) endeavors: we’re debuting OAuth wizards (an awesome new feature), and Yahoo joins our Choreo Library.

OAuth wizards
These wizards are a part of our Credential tool and specifically serve APIs that use OAuth for authentication. They offer step-by-step guidance to obtain OAuth values, simplifying and streamlining the often time-consuming and technically difficult process of getting credentials and putting them to work in your code.

OAuth wizard in action

Credentials, as you might recall, are a convenient way to handle third-party access — they store sensitive data so it can be easily utilized by your code, yet live separately from it (no more embedding passwords!).

We’re beginning to roll out OAuth wizards for selected APIs, with more on the way. In this round: Dropbox Choreos and from the Google family: Calendar, Contacts, Latitude, Picasa.

Yahoo joins our Choreo Library
We’re welcoming the Yahoo bundle to our Choreo Library, supporting the Weather, PlaceFinder, and Finance APIs. Start thinking of all you can do with locational weather info, the capacity of converting street names into geographical coordinates, and financial market news.

We hope you’ll use these new additions to augment your app-building superpowers. And, we’d love to hear your feedback — after all, we make these for you.

Version (numero 1.71) of Temboo is being released today and includes the fruit of our creative (and bug-stomping) endeavors: we’re debuting OAuth wizards (an awesome new feature), and Yahoo joins our Choreo Library. OAuth wizards These wizards are a part of our Credential tool and specifically serve APIs that use OAuth for authentication. They offer […]

A lightweight, situational app — fast

June 12 2012

A custom Choreo built for the app.

Mixing and matching app functionality, Matthew Flaming created a quickie app to distribute his Portland Code Camp presentation materials in 28 minutes, in less than 50 lines of code, and using TwilioTemboo, and Gmail:

This kind of modular approach is a key tenet of component model software development, and to me it also seems to suggest a new way of thinking about apps in general. As the ecosystem of rich, pluggable, prefab APIs and services proliferates, the cost of developing software applications should correspondingly decrease (at least in some cases). Rather than thinking of applications as enduring, long-term products or services, we’ll start to regard a lot of software as an ephemeral, disposable, on-demand tool. I expect we’ll see more and more of these situational apps in years to come.

Read more about his mash-up, which he made as “a litmus test for the idea of snap-together one-time apps,“ here.

A custom Choreo built for the app. Mixing and matching app functionality, Matthew Flaming created a quickie app to distribute his Portland Code Camp presentation materials in 28 minutes, in less than 50 lines of code, and using Twilio, Temboo, and Gmail: This kind of modular approach is a key tenet of component model software development, and to me it also seems […]
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